All the Fat in the Fire and All the Beef in the Pot

Here is a transcription and translation of the story that appears here. There are some notes at the bottom. As usual, I have attempted to transcribe exactly, so any spelling errors in the original will remain. The English translation is somewhat stilted as I have tried to keep close to the Irish.

All the Fat in the Fire and All the Beef in the Pot

Do bhí buachaill aimsire ag obair i dtig a chómharsain aon uair amháin. Sé an obair a bhí ar siúbhal aige ná ag cur phrátaí. Do chuaidh sé isteach sa tig chun a phíopa a dheargadh. Nuair a chuaidh sé anonn chun na teine do chonnaic sé corcán mór ar an dteine. Do bhain sé an clúmhdach don chorcán agus cad a bheadh ann ná feóil. Do chuaidh sé amach sa pháirc arís agus dubhairt sé leis féin go mbeadh dinnéar maith aige an lá san. Tamall ‘na dhiaidh san do ghlaodhad isteach é chun a dhinnéar d’ithe.
Nuair a shuig sé chun an bhúird do chonnaic sé prátaí agus salann roimhis. Níor leig sé aonnídh air go raibh a dhinnéar ithte aige. D’eirig sé ón mbórd annsan agus dubhairt sé:
“All the fat in the fire, and all the beef in the pot agus beidh fhios (be bios) agaibh lá an fhóghmair, cé mhéid (an mór) dhon fheóil a fuair Jack.” Do chuaidh sé amach sa pháirc annsan agus do thug se mála mór síol amach leis agus chun iad a chrádh do chuir sé leath bhuicéad síol síos i ngac aon pholl. Nuair a fhás na prátaí is amhlaidh a bhí scart* mór (pnéocha) pnéacha annso is annsúd ar fuid na páirce.

Translation

A servant boy was once working in his neighbour’s house. The work he was doing was planting potatoes. He went into the house to light his pipe. When he went over to the fire he saw a big pot on the fire. He took the covering off the pot and what was [would be] there was meat. He went out into the field again and he said to himself that he’d have a good dinner that day. A while after that he was called in to eat his dinner.
When he sat at the table he saw potatoes and salt before him. He didn’t let on that he had eaten his dinner. He rose from the table then and said:
All the fat in the fire, and all the beef in the pot and ye will know on the harvest day how much of the meat Jack got.” He went out into the field then and he took a big bag of seeds out with him and in order to sow them he put a half bucket of seeds down in every single hole. When the potatoes grew the fact is that there was a big portion* of roots here and there all over the field.

Notes

ag cur phrátaí – planting potatoes. Lenition is usually found after the progressive in Cléire. In Muskerry it is at least found in common phrases (ag fáil bháis, ag baint fhéir, etc.).
ar fuid (ar fud) – all over.
chun iad a chrádh – to torture them? I don’t think so. I wonder if perhaps “chun iad a churtha” (“in order to sow them”) is meant. In Cléire, in constructions with a pronoun and “chun” (pronounced and often written “chuin”), the verbal noun is usually (though not invariably) put in the genitive (which often corresponds to the verbal adjective in form). For example: “chuin é a cheannaithe” instead of “chun é a cheannach”. I wonder if perhaps then “chun iad a churtha” in rapid speech could be rendered as “chun iad a chrádh”. If not, then I am at a loss as to the meaning of this.
deargadh – verbal noun of “deargaim” (I redden, I light). Used when lighting things.
d’ithe (a ithe) – to eat. Munster Irish often using “do” as a particle here (which was the traditional form).
gac (gach) – every. This is a spelling mistake. It should be “gach” (pronounced “geach” /g´ax/ in Cléire).
glaodhad (glaodhadh) – A typo, this should be “glaodhadh” meaning, roughly, “was called”; however, it is an autonomous form where the actor isn’t specified, rather than truly being a passive.
is amhlaidh – is is placed at the beginning of a sentence (followed by the relative form) in order to emphasise the following verb. I rendered it here as “the fact is…”, but it could be stated as something like “it is thus…”
pnéocha/pnéacha (fréamhacha) – roots.
*scart – I am not sure what this means. It may be connected to scar, scair or scairt. Perhaps something like “a great portion/layer of roots”, if a form of variant of “scair”.
síol (síolta?) – This appears to be a genitive plural (“of seeds”). The Standard Irish genitive plural form would be síolta.

Comments and corrections are welcome!

I make use of this source with thanks to Dúchas.ie, under the conditions of the CC BY-NC 4.0 licence.

An Tuille – The Flood

Here is a transcription and translation of the story that appears here. There are some comments at the bottom, along with a vocabulary. As usual, I have attempted to transcribe exactly, so any spelling errors in the original will remain.

Sgeul.

Do bhí beirt fhear ó Chléire sa Sciobairín fadó agus bhí fear ón ndúthaig amuich, a’ caint leo, istig i siopa. Le bád a chuadar ann, agus ars duine d’fhearaibh Cléire le na chomráda, “Is gearr go mbeidh tuille ann”. Do bhí fear na Dúthaighe ag eisteacht leis. “Cad é sin agat dá rádh?” ars fear na dúthaighe, “Dar ndóigh níl aon tuille indiu ann, na aon deallramh báistidhe”. Ars fear Cléire ‘á fhreagairt, “Da mbeadhfá-sa agam-sa i nGasconán (an súnta idir Inis Arcain agus Cléire) anáirde, do neósfainn-se duit, cathain a thiocfadh lá tuille gan baisteach.

Story.

There were two men from Cléire in Skibbereen long ago and there was a local man, talking to them, inside in a shop. By boat they had come, and one of the Cléire men said to his comrade, “It won’t be long before there’s a flood”. The local man was listening to him. “What are you saying?” said the local man, “Of course there’s no flood today, nor any look of rain”. Said the Cléire man in response, “If I had you with me in Gasconán (the cleft between Sherkin Island and Cléire) up high [from the waves], I’d tell you when a day of flood would come without rain.

Notes:

  • “ón ndúthaig amuich” (ón ndúiche amuigh) – I believe “amuich” (outside, outer) being used to give the sense that this man is an “outlander” from the perspective of the islanders.

Foclóirín:

As usual, (pre.) indicates a pre-reform spelling and (dial.) a dialectical spelling or variant and I have enclosed the modern “Standard Irish” equivalent in brackets.

anáirde (in airde) – up high, up in the air (pre. variant)
amuich (amuigh) – outside, outer (pre. variant)
deallramh (dealramh) – appearance (pre.)
indiu (inniu) – today (this word is pronounced “inniubh” in Munster and is often written as such, but indiu is spelling in Classical Irish) (pre.)
is gearr go – it won’t be long before
neosfainn (d’inseoinn) – I would tell (dial.)
tuille (tuile) – flood (dial.)

Comments and corrections are welcome!

I make use of this source with thanks to Dúchas.ie, under the conditions of the CC BY-NC 4.0 licence.

An Próca Óir – The Crock of Gold

Here is a transcription and translation of the story that appears here. There are some comments at the bottom, along with a vocabulary. As usual, I have attempted to transcribe exactly, so any spelling errors in the original will remain.

Sgéul.

Ar an dtaobh shoir don bhaile seo (Cumolán) tá cuas ar a dtugtar Cuas a Dubhghlais. Aige bun a bhóthair atá sí agus sruthán uisge a rith síos ann. Deirtear go bhfuil próca óir curtha shíos sa chuas san agus fear gorm agus claidheamh aige á ghárdaíl.

Seo mar a thárla do bheith ann d’réir na sean sgéulta:- Fadó, fadó riamh tháinig long ón Austráil ar dtír san áit sin a lorg fíoruisge. Ní ró fhada ar dtír dóibh go dtáinig an tóir ón bhfairrge ortha. Ní raibh ach an próca óir sin acu agus thugadar as an luing é agus chuireadar annsan istig i dtóin a’ chuais é agus chuireadar an fear gorm mar ghárda air. Chuireadar geasa air an t-ór a chosaint beo agus marbh do go dtiocfaidís féin á iarraidh aris. Tá sé dóigheamhail nár thánadar chun an fhir bhoicht a fhuasgailt fós, mar ar uair áirighthe nach aon oidhche cloistear mar a bheadh duine ag gearán thíos san chuas.

Story.

On the East side of this town (Cumolán) there’s a hollow known as “Douglas’s Hollow”. It’s at the bottom of the road and a stream of water runs down there. It is said there there is a crock of gold put down in that hollow and a black man and his sword guarding it.

This is how its being there came about according to the old stories: – Long, long ago, a ship came to land from Australia in that place looking for fresh water. They weren’t long on land before pursuit from the sea came upon them. They only had that crock of gold and they took it from the ship and put it there in the bottom of the hollow and they set the black man as the guard of it. They put binding spells upon him to guard the gold, be he dead or alive, until they themselves would come seeking it again. It is likely that they never came to release/deliver the poor man yet, because at certain times every night it is heard as though there is a person complaining down in the hollow.

Notes:

  • a rith is simply “ag rith” (running), however the g isn’t pronounced.
  • beo agus marbh do – be he dead or alive (interesting that agus is used instead of nó here). The use of “do” rather than “dó” is dialectical.
  • don bhaile seo – don and den are somewhat confused in Munster.

Foclóirín:

As usual, (pre.) indicates a pre-reform spelling and (dial.) a dialectical spelling or variant and I have enclosed the modern “Standard Irish” equivalent in brackets.

aige (ag) – at (dial.)
claidheamh (claíomh) – sword (pre.)
ar dtír – on land. An example of how the article can be dropped when a word is used in a generic sense. The preposition “ar” eclipses in certain calcified expressions.
as an luing (as an long) – out of the boat. We see a dative form here. (dial.)
dóigheamhail (dóighiúil, a variant of “dóchúil”) – likely, probable (pre., dial.)
fairrge (farraige) – sea (pre.)
fhuasgailt (fhuascailt) – release (pre.)
fíoruisge (fíoruisce) – fresh water, spring water (pre.)
geasa – plural of geas (spell, taboo)
nach aon (gach aon) – every single (dial.)
ortha (orthu) – on/upon them (dial.)
próca óir – crock of gold
shíos (thíos) – down. This is normally a dialectical way of spelling thíos, but it seems to be being used here in a way you’d expect síos to be used. (dial.)
shoir (thoir) – east (dial.)

Comments and corrections are welcome!

I make use of this source with thanks to Dúchas.ie, under the conditions of the CC BY-NC 4.0 licence.